Getting Started with Twitter Analytics

The Cool Thing That Prompted This Post

A cool thing happened this week and spawned the idea for this week’s blog post.  I started noticing that users who use Sumall.com for their analytics were using those analytics to thank their top retweeters. The auto-generated tweet gives a cute little image with an automated thank you to the best retweeter or top follower etc.  It’s the first time I’ve seen this done with a suitable image. Here’s an example:

 

The other factor was that my own thank you came from Andrew MaCarthy, the author of the bestselling 500 Social Media Marketing Tips book.  So I was one of his ‘best retweeters’ this week.  Nice.

For one thing, it reminded me that it’s best only to retweet something that you find credible, interesting or generally tweet-worthy for your industry. And for another, I was flattered.  I mean, he’s not a bestselling author for nothing: his book is REALLY good.  If you’re learning something online that you’re not sure stacks up either analytically or intuitively, his book is a great cross-reference point with tried and tested common sense strategies.

I like the idea of publishing your stats as a marketing tool in themselves and including the people who put you there.  More mentions whilst you’re at it: bonus.

If you don’t have an account with Sumall.com then the free version of http://www.retweetrank.com/ is one tool you can use to check your best retweeter.  As with any of these tools, the free versions are pretty good but there’s always a hook that will make you want to sign up to their pro version, for example where most of your mentions came from.  You may have hunches about your most frequent retweeters or mentioners, but sometimes raw data proves startling.

As for other Twitter Analytics?

Twitter’s own analytics are brilliant.  To check your own, just make sure you’re signed into Twitter, then open a new tab and type Twitter Analytics. There’s a whole page of interesting data available.  You can drill down from your dashboard to view engagement rate, impressions earned, graphs of likes per day, audience features by interest and a whole host of other facts.  Here are some of my stats so you can see the type of thing available (and have a nosey at @ZebraConsulting’s performance)

Geographical location of audience

How is your audience logging on to your account?  This may help to ensure your images are suitable for viewing

The next one made me glad I hadn't gone all pink with my branding

Modest stats here. I could argue I'm too busy with client's likes, but hey it's early days

This could help to keep your tweets focussed on what your audience wants to read about

This is cool. I shamelessly used this to thank her for being my top follower

So, do check out your own analytics and let me know if you find anything surprising.

Tweepi.com

I use Tweepi.com which is like a very powerful database for sorting your Twitter followers and followees.  It shows you at a glance which of your followers are inactive, which are the most active, when they last tweeted, the geographical area they come from.  You can basically sort by any criteria.  You can quickly unfollow any undesirables or add relevant people to lists.  It’s only £6.17 per month when you pay for an annual subscription.  They discontinued the service of unfollowing those who do not follow you fairly recently, however, I still think it’s a good service.

Homework

Your homework this week is to review your Twitter Analytics.  Also for the curious and time-rich (as if!) have a go at Googling which analytical tools are available to provide the information you really want.  If freebie versions are not explicit then cross check your sources by taking a look at reviews combined with ‘how to’ users guides on YouTube for more information.

What do Analytics mean for your strategy?

Interesting they might be, but once you have some stats to play with, please follow it through to conclusion by interpreting what this means for your social media strategy.

What goals are you setting for next month?  Make sure all your goals are SMART, that is: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic & Time-Based.

Any questions?  Just get in touch!